Studio 54 Opened in New York April 26th 1977

Studio 54 attracts New York Stars


The Daily Item Sunbury, Pennsylvania


People magazine gave Studio 54 its smooch of approval, calling it -"the world's top celebrity disco." Studio 54 was a club for dancing on New York City's West 54th Street, between Broadway and Eighth Avenue. 





On almost any night of the week, one was able to find the famous partying at Studio -54. Liza Minelli, after dancing like mad through "The Act,".' sometimes retired to Studio 54 to dance madly into the night. Streisand has appeared. Farrah Fawcett came to New York and went to Studio 54. Halston attends. And Baryshnikov and Warren Beatty and Margaux Hemingway.


The dancing was fun, but the essence of this place was off the floor. Pull back the disco blanket and what one viewed was startling: this grand, dark room to those outside, a modern holy place of glamour and excitement filled with people who have arranged their arms, hands, heads, eyes into poses one sees in Vogue or Gentleman's Quarterly. It was a pleasing collage of languid draped forms. A Bloomingdale's window. 

Rubell personally confers the privilege of entry (and the price of privilege weekends is $10) There is a hierarchy of the worthy. Celebrities always. 


The non-famous but very beautiful, almost always. Some hoi polloi. Broadway dancers. Many homosexual men. Displaced European royalty, of whom Rubell says; "Turn some of these princes and princesses upside down and you'd be lucky if 25 cents dropped out; they're like loss leaders."


Forbidden entry: men alone (considered predatory). 

Nonetheless, Rubell says with enthusiasm that on occasion, the ambiance at Studio 54 is like "something out of Fellini." Federico Fellini stunned audiences in 1960 with his film "La Dolce Vita," a portrait of life among Rome's leisure class. Rubell is a man of shrewd instinct, and his analogy is appropriate. For once past the vigilant young man who keeps Studio 54's coveted door, one indeed enters the sweet life New York, circa 1977. 





How has such intense popularity come to pass? It began, says Rubell, the night Blanca Jagger rented the club for her husband's 34th birthday. After that, Studio 54 was like a crisp, open field for the local paparazzi and gossip columnists. Picture and news of the pretty quail flitting through the night at 54 appeared almost daily in the city's tabloids. 


Item: The small, terrified face of Christina Onassis, photographed as she departed the club, is printed large on the afternoon daily's front page with the quotation: "I am not news. I am alone." 

Nonetheless, Rubell says with enthusiasm that on occasion, the ambiance at Studio 54 is like "something out of Fellini." Federico Fellini stunned audiences in 1960 with his film "La Dolce Vita," a portrait of life among Rome's leisure class. Rubell is a man of shrewd instinct, and his analogy is appropriate. For once past the vigilant young man who keeps Studio 54's coveted door, one indeed enters the sweet life New York, circa 1977. 


This is a disco, which means that instead of the air one breathes the music, disco music, Disco tunes are black music's fallen angels, direct descendants of the mystical rhythmic beauty of Negro spirituals. Disco music is slick, hellish fun. At Studio 54, it never stops. It covers everything. 


Activity inside consists primarily of dancing or not dancing. Those not dancing watch those who are, while a dazzling light show of garish, unsettling colour evolves overhead. 


The dancing was fun, but the essence of this place was off the floor. Pull back the disco blanket and what one viewed was startling: this grand, dark room to those outside, a modern holy place of glamour and excitement filled with people who have arranged their arms, hands, heads, eyes into poses one sees in Vogue or Gentleman's Quarterly. It was a pleasing collage of languid draped forms. A Bloomingdale's window. 


#April #26thApril

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